“I Don’t See Color”: White Caregivers Raising BIPOC Children

In previous generations, the phrase “I don’t see color” was a mark of being progressive. Parents would use the phrase to explain why the differences of another person were not important when cultivating relationships. By telling children the color of a person does not matter, it also allows for parents and caregivers to avoid having…

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Teach Your Children Well

The 2020-2021 school year has officially ended at schools across the country, and we are heading into another season of mixed thoughts and emotions. Just as has been the case in the past year of the COVID pandemic, that will mean different things to different people and families. While we are eager to put the…

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One for the Yearbooks: A Time to Process the End of Another School Year in a Pandemic

We have arrived at the end of another school year in a pandemic. Many of the meaningful traditions we look forward to this time each year may once again not be possible. As many schools move to re-create significant events like graduations and proms in order to follow safety guidelines, they may look and feel…

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The Transition Back to School

September 10, 2020

September brings with it the realization that we are still living within the confines of COVID-19 restrictions. As families transition into this new school year, it’s a reminder of how challenging this “new normal” can be for children and parents. It’s a parent’s role to help children manage their stress; This can be especially difficult…

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Co-Parenting 101: Raising Kids, Together and Apart

June 29, 2020

So, you have recently decided to separate. Perhaps you have been divorced for years or maybe you were never married. In any case, raising a child with someone you aren’t partnered with or living with anymore changes the situation. There is no single exhaustive list of how-to’s about co-parenting, and every parent, child, and family…

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Talking to Children About COVID-19

May 18, 2020

COVID-19 is being discussed everywhere, every day. Whether it’s the political aspects, the statistics, or the warning signs, chances are, if you have had your TV on in the last two months, your child has picked up pieces of information. Some parents may be having direct conversations with children about the pandemic, while others may…

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Keeping College Admissions In Perspective

March 27, 2019

If you’re a senior in high school or the parent of a senior in high school, the end of March is more about college admissions than the beginning of spring. The recent college admissions scandal is just one example of how parents can become overwhelmed and over-involved in the lives and decisions of the high…

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Yes, Your Teenager Wants to Talk to You About Porn

February 20, 2018

Kristine Seitz, M.Ed, MSW, LSW is a sexuality educator and Licensed Social Worker who specializes in providing therapy to adolescents, adults, and young adults experiencing anxiety, communication and intimacy issues, depression, grief and loss, infidelity, relationship issues, sexual abuse, sexuality concerns, and trauma.  After reading New York Times Magazine’s article What Teenagers are Learning from Online…

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Co-Parenting After Divorce: How to Set Aside Differences and Support Your Kids

January 30, 2018

  This blog was originally published on Counsel Philadelphia and is re-posted here with the author’s permission.  Adam Goodman is a former Staff Therapist at Council for Relationships and a licensed attorney experienced in divorce mediation and co-parenting.  Co-parenting is hard, especially if уоu have a contentious rеlаtіоnѕhір with уоur ex-partner. Yоu may bе соnсеrnеd аbоut your…

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The Lifelong Benefits of Military Family Life for Adult Children

December 20, 2017

At Council for Relationships, our Staff Therapists come from diverse backgrounds that have shaped their clinical practices. Staff Therapist Rita DeMaria, PhD, LMFT, CST spent her young life abroad in Japan, Ethiopia, and Turkey as her family moved around to accommodate her father’s military career. Read in her own words how this experience shaped her…

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November is National Adoption Month

November 3, 2017

November marks the annual celebration of adoption. This is something to be celebrated, but it’s also important to remember that adoption, especially for the adoptees, comes with an element of loss. Even in the best-case scenarios, adoptees will need support and guidance throughout their lives with processing their feelings, and how being adopted has impacted…

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How to Deal with Halloween Anxiety

October 25, 2017

Halloween is a time of frights, horror, and of course, candy.  Although goblins and ghouls can entice some, for many it can be a time of terror – not the good kind. For some, it can heighten anxiety that was present before the trick or treating has even begun. Children are especially prone to anxiety…

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Why the Crisis of Teen Suicide Needs More Attention

October 9, 2017

We at Council for Relationships agree with Dr. Daniel Taylor’s article that ran in yesterday’s Philadelphia Inquirer. We appreciate all of the work that he and his colleagues at Drexel University School of Medicine and St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children have done in this area, as well as the efforts of the City of Philadelphia’s…

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Kindergarten Wall, A poem about children and stress

September 7, 2016

Children are amazing little seeds that will someday grow into wise and sturdy trees. Parents, teachers, and therapists are some of the most helpful resources and advocates for today’s children. With so much going on in the world, so many expectations in school, and abundant research on how childhood relationships shape young people long into…

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Depression: Fighting the Stigma

February 10, 2016

Two high school students recently wrote an article about their squashed efforts to bring mental health issues out into the open at their school. Their voice was heard by The New York Times, which both printed and published the article “Depressed, But Not Ashamed” online. The students’ opinion has sparked debate and support. Karyn Feit,…

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How to Have an Effective Family Meeting

Our families are the foundations on which our children build their self-esteem and their mental and emotional health. The acceptance they experience and the love they see in their family’s eyes reflect an image for them as the young self develops. Having family meetings can be a way to solidify the family foundations that help…

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Thoughts from the Movie “Boyhood”

The Oscar-nominated film Boyhood takes us on a young man’s journey through 12 years. The poignant movie shows the mistakes and triumphs of one family, with parts that we can all relate to. We asked our therapists to share their thoughts from the movie. Read their feelings on Boyhood below before the Academy Awards this Sunday. (Spoiler Alert:…

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Tips for Talking to Kids About Tragedy

August 27, 2014

Ferguson. Newtown. Earthquakes. Robin Williams.  It’s hard to know what to say, how to say it and when to say it, especially when trying to explain difficult topics to little minds. Here are some things to be mindful of when trying to make sense of a complex situation: Keep calm and understand: Get down to…

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Back-to-School Blues

August 19, 2014

Jeff Beers, LMFT is a former Staff Therapist at Council for Relationships. He now serves as Staff Therapist and Manager of Operations and Program Development at Menergy, an intervention, treatment, training and education program working to stop harmful behavior and intimate partner violence. Fall brings many changes to the lives of children and adolescents, and…

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Countdown to Kindergarten-5 Easy Steps to Ease the Transition

So, your young child has graduated from pre-school and will soon be attending Kindergarten. Or perhaps your child did not attend pre-school and they are preparing for their first significant block of time away from you. First of all, Congratulations Mom and Dad! You have shepherded your child through their early developmental years. For some…

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Parenting and Stress Management

March 18, 2013

Parenting is hard. No question about it. Just look around and you can see parents screaming at their kids, scowling silently or perhaps close to tears. Children have a way of getting into the deepest and most primal part of our psyches. When we least expect it, we feel out of control with our buttons…

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